Category: Career Wise

Difference Between The Best Candidate and Best Hire

If you’ve read my posts in the past, you will be familiar with my advice on being the candidate who is hired: It is the one who is most knowledgeable about the job, company and industry, the candidate who matches the company culture and the one with the deepest success rate in the area that the company needs the most help.

Below is a link to an article by Lou Adler that backs up my advice with a stats and a great graphic.  Interestingly, Adler’s target audience is hiring managers.  He points out that the typical sequence in an interview identifies the best candidate, not the best hire.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bias-prevents-best-candidates-from-being-hired-lou-adler/

For those of us on the other side of the interview desk, Adler shows an opening for proving our value by answering questions that go beyond the basic benchmarks.  We must show that we can collaborate, lead a team, mentor, prioritize, manage time and money as well as having a pretty face.

When asked about our track record, we must include the how as well as the stats.  If we show that we succeeded by performing specific team-building functions or  by co-incidentally reducing both time on task and costs, we show the qualities that make us the best hire as well as the best-performing candidate.

The difference between a manager and a leader is the ability leaders have for helping others move forward, promoting the whole team, while accomplishing goals.  Employers want managers but also need leaders.  Lets show the hiring manager that we are both!

Strut your stuff!  Lets work on you profile so that you are ready when opportunity knocks! 610-212-6679 stephanie@accessguidance.com

 

 

5 Tips For Interview Prep

The best way to have calm nerves when facing an interview is to begin preparing before you get the call.  These 5 are proven and professional.

1. Like a politician, have your talking points ready.  Know your strengths as they relate to the position and your ability to do the job.  Have anecdotes  prepared that show your past performance at these tasks.

2. Your talking points are stories and anecdotes that show your past successes and ability to meet the needs of the role you are interviewing for.  At a college interview  you will show how you will add to the campus culture through your interests and high school experiences.

3, Know who the interviewers will be.  Google them to find commonalities that will make them more familiar and give you points for small talk at the beginning of the interview.  For students, learn if the interviewer is a graduate of the college and prepare a couple of questions to ask about that experience.

4. Know before you go.  The more you know about the role, company and industry the better prepared you will be and the more confident you will feel.  The job-and the college admission-go to the one who can demonstrate their fit.  The only way to do that is to know more than the other candidates!

5. Follow your answer with questions that give the interviewer the opportunity to explain more about the job or company.  Good questions are “What are your top priorities for the person you hire?” or “What do you think first year students should prioritize during the first few weeks on campus?”  You will appear savvy and make the interview more conversational.  A definite stress-buster!

It doesn’t hurt to write down some of the questions you think the interviewer will ask and practice with someone asking them.  Practice getting the information you want the interviewer to know into your conversation to avoid the head-slapping realization that you missed opportunities to sell your best qualities.

I’m ready to practice with you and have dozens of questions we can prep.  Stephanie@accessguidance.com or 610-212-6679

 

Hashtags Job Hunters Need To Know

15 Great Twitter Hashtags to Secure Your Dream Job

by Kate Jones | Aug 17, 2017 | Social Media Job Seeking |Career Enlightenment

Hashtags to find an employer:

  1. #hiring: Unsurprisingly, the number one hashtag hiring managers use.
  2. #joblisting: This one is pretty much guaranteed to take you straight to a role specification.
  3. #tweetmyjobs: This has been tagged nearly a million times so it’s worth including in your search.
  4. #ukjobs: If you’re looking for something UK based this will take you straight to the goods. You can also change it up with #*yourcity*jobs to get super specific.
  5. #graduate: If you’re fresh out of university, use this hashtag to find graduate positions.

Hashtags to let employers know you’re looking:

  1. #hireme: Get straight to the point – you’re on the lookout!
  2. #resume: Twice as popular as #CV, this is the one to use if you’re sharing your resume online.
  3. #MBA: If you have an MBA, let potential employers know about your impressive educational background.
  4. #HR: This hashtag makes your post visible to anyone searching in the HR thread.
  5. #careerchange: Great if you’re looking to take your career in a new direction.

Industry specific hashtags:

  1. #salesjobs: This popular hashtag will take you straight to sales jobs listings.
  2. #accounting: If you’re an accountant you’re in luck – listings in this field come up regularly on Twitter.
  3. #SEO: A popular area for recruitment, this one has been tagged more than a million times by job seekers.
  4. #journojobs: For budding journalists, look no further than this hashtag to find your dream position.
  5. #industry: Use this with another tag like #tech or #marketing and you’ll find listings matched to your area of expertise.

If you have a crystal-clear idea of what you’re after, hashtag the specific job you are looking for. This is perfect for those of us in specialist industries such as web development, HR or professional services.

Another option if you’re looking for something a little more niche is this clever tool from Hashtagify which allows you to search for popular hashtags.

Finally, a great way to grab the attention of a potential employer is by using a picture with your tweet – Twitter posts with images receive 150% more engagement.

Conventional methods for finding a job are slowly fading into the background, and the hashtag is now your best friend for securing the position of your dreams. Twitter should be right up there at the top of your list of ways to find your next role.

 

Take The Sting Out Of Constructive Criticism

When the boss says, We should talk”  you can feel the hair on your arms stand at attention because you know that you are about to be chastized.  The anticipation can be agonizing.

 

In  that moment of truth, try these 3 things to reduce the sting.

1.  Adopt your boss’s point of view.  You are all on a team with the goal of making the company more efficient and profitable.  Identify the experience as a coaching session from which you can lean how to do those things better.

2. Ask questions to clarify the issue.  Pause to think before you react.  Its human to become defensive but a quick reaction probably won’t be an advantage.  Ask how you can improve then set goals.

3.  Identify the underlying problem.  If you aren’t meeting deadlines, perhaps it is because you are using a different system of priorities or failing to prioritize at all.  Everyone has time management difficulties from time to time.  Do co-workers frequently drop new assignments on your desk or request your help in a way that makes completing your own tasks difficult?

When you have found the factors underlying problem, define a solution and talk to your boss so she knows that you have heard and are working to resolve the difficulty.

Would it help to talk about your difficulties at work?  An objective outsider can help you identify work-around solutions to underlying problems.   Lets get together! stephanie@accssguidance.com or 6110-212-6679

 

 

Rules For Making A Budget You Can Stick To

Tips from Alan Carniol:
Now, I’ll be the first to admit that budgeting doesn’t top my list of fun things to do. Nonetheless, it’s critical to create a budget.
Why?
Because money is a scarce resource for many of us, and every dollar we spend on something that isn’t really important to us, is a dollar we won’t have to put toward our dreams.
That’s why I was happy to share a unique software tool I found out about recently.
It’s called You Need a Budget, and it’s based on four simple rules. If you follow these four rules, you’ll transform budgeting from a tedious chore into a simple, straightforward, and uncomplicated process.
You’ll also make your next paycheck go MUCH further.
What are these four simple rules?
Here’s a brief summary:Rule One: Give Every Dollar a Job
Avoid spending money unintentionally, by first asking yourself, “What should this money do before I’m paid again?”Rule Two: Embrace Your True Expenses
It’s important to decide what your money should do for you – now and down the road. Understanding, and embracing, your actual expenses is critical to figuring out your budget.Rule Three: Roll With the Punches
If your budget needs to be changed, then you can just go ahead and change it at any time – without guilt or handwringing.

Rule Four: Age Your Money
Instead of trying to precisely time your bills with your paychecks, work toward spending money today that you earned at least a month earlier.

These four simple rules from You Need A Budget make controlling your finances much more manageable.

Alan Carniol
Founder of Interview Success, Inc.
Copyright © 2018, Interview Success, Inc. All rights reserved.

Uncommon Answers to Common Interview Questions

Interview questions are asked to elicit particular information.  No matter what the situation,  you can give answers that are positive and highlight something that you want the interviewer to know about you, your experience, your goals, your strengths, how you can help the company solve a problem.

Read the article from The Must that covers 31 typical questions and customized answers that will make you stand out.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-answer-the-31-most-common-interview-questions?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20180126&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20180126&bsft_eid=dfe63d12-32e1-4683-ab88-8a37ff56408b&bsft_clkid=a38135f8-4040-4411-be91-2ff1657d2c24&bsft_uid=be2b7c7a-3fd7-45c5-8bf4-6e7a7b9064ed&bsft_mid=35b3778a-1237-411e-b666-0091d12dbebd

When you’re ready we’ll craft your own answers to interview questions. 610-212-6679, stephanie@accessguidance.com

Where Resumes and Job Ads Don’t Match

One of the most basic parameters for creating a resume that attracts attention and passes the Applicant Tracking System is  a match between the requirements listed in the job posting and those on a resume.

LiveCareer analyzed several thousand resumes and job openings in 12 career areas, about one quarter of all job categories, to find where applicants claims don’t match the needs of the employers.  They found several gaps that are easily plugged.

Increasingly, soft skills are important to companies hiring.  Soft skills are communication, customer service and so on. Other gaps between desired  qualities and offered skills found by hiring managers are in multitasking, knowledge of retail industry, teamwork, and a positive attitude.

These asks make up one quarter to one half of those listed as necessary but don’t make it onto most resumes.  Job posting typically ask for over 20 items,  resumes claim, on average, 13.  It is easy to put relevant experience with examples into a resume matching the words used by the hiring party.

If you want to get your resume to the person who will decide to interview you, take time to match the requirements to your skills, 1:1.  Have qualifiers ready to prove your ability to meet expectations.  Don’t bother to include things like budgeting, time management or use of Microsoft Word, or anything else not asked for.  The ATS looks for the words the hiring manager tells it to look for and will skip over anything else.

Bring me your job posting and your experience and we’ll craft a resume that passes the ATS and makes it to the hiring manager.  stephanie@accessguidance.com or 610-212-6679/

 

 

Curious About MIT?

Daan Mulder
Daan Mulder, studied at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Several things come to mind:

  • The professor you’ve just casually chatted with and asked about his/her research is actually a Nobel prize winner.
  • Everyone talks in code and it seems to make perfect sense: I’ll see you at E52; I’m taking 780 from course 15.
  • We complain that we should have gone to an easy college, like Harvard.
  • We constantly reference IHTFP (“I hate this f***ing place”) while secretly love every second here.
  • The institute is taken seriously by almost everyone. When we send emails from the MIT domain name (name@mit.edu) answer is almost always guaranteed.
  • You constantly feel inadequate by the level of the people around you (at orientation they even point out that it’s perfectly normal to have the “imposter syndrome”, i.e., feeling like you were admitted by mistake, as clearly you don’t feel like you deserve to be here with these people).
  • Sending an email to a wide distribution list saying “there is food left at [location]” and within seconds a swarm of hungry mouths descend, devour, and leave.
  • Playing with the beaver is totally not a sexual thing.

PS – sorry if this sounds like humblebrag. We’re really not full of ourselves here 🙂

 

ONE More comment from me: the most popular minor at MIT is music!

If MIT isn’t in your future, we can build a list of great colleges where you will thrive. stephanie@accessguidance.com pr 610-212-6679.

Cheap Apps For Career Advancement

We all need help with some aspect of our business life.  Just handling incoming email can be a challenge.  Here are a few apps, free or inexpensive ones, that will help you take your career to the next level. Students, take note, these can help you, too.

When you must give a presentation or are prepping for a job interview, use UMMO to up your game.  Record what you plan to say and get an immediate response.  Great for ditching the place holders, like, you know, um, uh. Whatever.

Network like crazy with Whova.  Before you attend a networking event, conference or professional gathering, find out who will be there so you are prepped to talk to those most influential or interesting.  There is also a feature to post job openings or perhaps the one you’re looking for.

Find golden opportunities with Golden, the app for volunteer opportunities.  One of the best ways to network and connect to potential jobs is to volunteer with others who share your interests.  Employers hire those they know or who are referred by people they know. Learn new skills and do some good for others as well as for yourself.

Another great way to make an impression is by giving outstanding presentations.  Prezi is an app that allows you to create interactive events that will WOW your audience.  You never know who will be watching!

Time saver app SLASH allows you to share content across devices and media without changing apps.  Type  /  to send almost any content almost anywhere.

LinkedIn Lookup allows you to get the skinny on people in your company.  When you need someone with particular skills,titles or background, find them through LinkedIn.

Become the Meeting Maven with Solid, the app that helps you organize, invite, create agendas for and keep records of, all your, meetings, one-off and recurring.  Earn kudos for your organizational skills!

With all the new responsibilities you will now have you need Timely to organize your schedule and give you reports on your to-do and done-it lists.