Category: Parents

How To Get The Most Affordable College Loans

You’ve read about students who graduate with mountains of debt and struggle to pay off their loans.  Borrowing money may be the only way to pay for some of the cost of higher education but being smart can make the pay back less painful.

According to Nerdwallet, borrowers should choose federal loans first.  Students are eligible because they don’t require the borrower to have previously established credit.  Federally backed loans have income-based repayment plans and for those in public service jobs there may be loan forgiveness.

If the federal loans aren’t enough, go first to the bank or credit union where your family does business for a private loan.  At a local bank, rather than a large national chain, you will be able to sit down with a bank official and discuss your needs where large chains may require you to do your loan shopping by phone.

Before you approach the loan officer, think about some options that may be important to you when its time to payback the loans.  Being able to release a co-signer, usually a parent or grandparent, from the loan upon your graduation is a courtesy to the co-signer and a solid business decision on your part. You may be find private loans with options to begin repaying later, or  the ability to stop paying temporarily if you hit a rough patch.

Forbearance is the term for a temporary halt to loan repayment while interest continues to accrue (adding to the total debt. Typically, forbearance is granted for 3 months at a time for up to a year.  Choose a bank with a clear forbearance policy.

In the matter of interest, a fixed rate is a better choice because you will know what the payments will be for the duration of the loan.  Variable rate loans usually have a low rate at the beginning but the rate is morel likely to go up than to go down before you pay off the loan and can change on a fixed schedule or whenever the prime rate changes.

Compare interest rates.  The lower it is, the less  your total payout will be. Borrowing $10,000 at 6.5% will make the total you repay 13,600.  at 5.5% the total will be $13,000.  Three ways to get the  lowest interest rate are to have excellent credit or have a co-signer with excellent credit; choose the shortest term for the loan you think you will be able to manage; sign up for autopay that deducts the payment automatically from a checking or savings account.

Look for discounts.  One common discount is paying the interest during the term of the loan while you are still in college.  Making interest payments can drop your rate by a while per cent. Sallie Mae offers this discount.

In addition to the interest rate, look at all the fees.  Some banks charge disbursement fees (for writing the check to you), origination fees (for processing the application), various administrative fees.  Any or all of these fees can be added to the loan amount or deducted from the amount of the check they write.   Be certain to compare late payment fees and penalties when you shop for a loan.

Keep in mind that you are likely to borrow a similar amount for each year you attend college.  Your repayment schedule should be comfortable when loans for 4 or more years are being repaid at the same time.

Parents, financial aid letters arrive with an offer of admission but are often written in ways that make comparison difficult.  Lets talk about how colleges put together an aid package and how to compare the difficult to understand aid offers.  610-212-6679 or stephanie@accessguidance.com

College Rankings: Helpful or Harmful?

Guidance counselors and independent educational consultants agree on many things; one of the strongest points for  high fives is disdain for the published college ranking system used by USNWR to sell magazines.  USNWR has about a dozen criteria; each year they manipulate the importance of the individual criteria so that the Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Stanford change positions.  None of the criteria have anything to do with educational outcomes.

Lynn O’Shaughnessy of The College Solution published a blog post listing 15 things that are wrong with the list.  Here are a few of her assessments.

  1.  One variable is ratings by administrators at the colleges in a given category such as Liberal Arts Colleges.  As O’Shaughnessy points out, the president and provost at  Lafayette probably have no idea of what goes on at  Endicott.
  2. Test scores, GPA, class rank help raise the position in USNWR rankings.  Each of these measures tend to be higher for students with more financial resources for a variety of reasons.  Colleges want to enroll students with higher benchmarks, ie wealthier students, skewing admission decisions.
  3. Related to #2 is the distribution of merit aid over need-based aid.  The former encourages wealthier students to attend and reduces resources for less well-heeled students.  With weatlthier students  showing up, costs can and do go up, disadvantaging everyone.
  4. Colleges now market strategically to encourage students that they don’t expect to admit to submit an application.  The more applicants a college denies, the more selective they appear and the higher the rank.  I know of one instance of a Tier One University admissions office personally inviting a student to apply, interview and then deny in a 2 week period near their application deadline.

Here’s the address of the entire article. http://www.thecollegesolution.com/15-things-to-know-about-u-s-news-college-rankings/

There are over 100 colleges and universities that have similar Tier One academic potential and outcomes to Ivies.  They are scattered around the US  and admit students based on many factors beyond the benchmarks.  Education is earned through hard work and where the education is earned is less important than the effort expended to earn it.  As Frank Bruni titled his book, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be.

Lets work together to develop a list of great colleges where you can thrive academically, be comfortable socially and not send your family to the poor house.  610-212-6679 or stephanie@accessguidance.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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College Interview: Why Should We Choose You?

Scott Mattox

I am an ivy league graduate and have been an alumni interviewer for over 15 years. I ask this question, in various forms, to all my applicants. Having heard hundreds of replies to this question let me first address how not to answer the question. All of the following are actual responses I have gotten over the years.

  1. Do not say I am “hard working, conscientious” etc. This is by far the most common answer. Virtually all applicants are academically successful, and this answer will not serve to differentiate you from them.
  2. Do not say you are a “good person” etc. Self analysis of personality traits is always suspect, and in reference to number 1, I would assume all applicants think that they are good people.
  3. Do not say “I will make the University famous and enhance their reputation.” This is actually a fairly common reply. While in some cases this may ultimately prove to be correct, by no means can anyone reliably predict this outcome. Also while some element of self confidence is good, this type of response borders on arrogance.

The ivies, and likely most elite schools want to have a diversified class. This does NOT mean that they want of lot of diversified students, rather they want students that are exceptional in many different areas. For example they would much rather have someone who excels in one area e.g. : number one tennis player in their state, national science fair winner, or nationally renowned violinist, rather than someone who has all A’s, plays on a few varsity teams, and was in the chorus. Also please know that your interviewer has heard hundreds of answers and can recognize “bullshit” even before it has completely left your mouth. Above all be honest!! Choose an area that you are accomplished in and try to show how the Universities resources can help you achieve a particular goal in this field. The following a some examples of the more successful answers I have received: One applicant started his own successful software company in high school, and was familiar with the University’s strengths in this area and gave specific examples of the courses he would take to further his career goals. Another student started a charity to support a particular school in the caribbean. Her interest was in third world economics, and she was able to show how her acceptance would allow her to work with certain professors to make a difference in this world.

In short, you need to find an area in which you excel, and then show how this University has unique resources to help you achieve specific goals related to this area. If you are honest, the interviewer will see how your acceptance will be mutally beneficial.

Students, this is also how you should answer the question “Why do you want to go here?”  Lets talk about how to show your exceptionality in an interview and on your applications.  stephanie@accessguidance.com or 610-212-6679

How To Nurture Your Children’s Gifts

I love to talk to parents of young children about preparing them for future success: getting into college and translating education into a satisfying life.  I came across this article that give some of the same advice that I offer.  Tips are not limited to children identified as talented or gifted.  Enjoy!

How to Help Your Gifted Child Thrive

Is Your Best Freshman Year A Gap Year?

https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Best-Freshman-Year-Is-a/243563

The Best Freshman Year Is a Gap Year

June 03, 2018

It’s that time of year again. High-school seniors across the country are finishing their final exams, cleaning out their lockers, and getting ready to walk up on stage to accept their diplomas. The students know where they’re going to college, and they’ll busy themselves over the coming months by looking into meal plans, registering for classes, and contacting their future roommates. Admissions deans are still analyzing yield targets with their staff and are already looking at what they could do differently next year. It’s a predictable cycle — except for one wrinkle.

An increasing number of students are questioning whether they are ready to dive straight into four more years of classroom lectures, research papers, and cramming for exams. Many are exhausted and burned out, eager to refuel their curiosity about the world through the kind of learning that won’t appear on a transcript.

Record numbers of students are contemplating a gap year before college, and they are looking for guidance on this important decision from the very colleges that admitted them. With a few exceptions, most students who inquire about a gap year will receive a silent nod from their admissions counselor and another form to fill out. Is that really the best we can do?Over the past five years, many college-admissions offices have adopted policies that allow students to defer their admission offer for one year. The gap year has become increasingly popular with admissions leaders, who have witnessed firsthand its positive impact on students and campus culture. Yet most colleges have remained resolutely agnostic as to what students should do on their gap year, and how they might pay for it.

At first glance this might make sense. The undergraduate clock starts ticking only when an incoming freshman sets foot on campus. Or does it? Not if you believe, as we do, that one of the most effective ways to improve college outcomes is to improve the inputs. A gap year designed with purpose and intent is a journey of personal growth that helps students successfully transition to college.

At a time when traditional four-year colleges are struggling to stay relevant and high-school graduates are hungry for real-­world experiences, why wouldn’t educators weigh in on the merits of a gap year? Isn’t it time for higher education to help students figure out what kind of experience will help them succeed in college and in life?

We recently worked with a group of experts to define the following key characteristics of a transformative gap year: It is purposeful and practical, involving some element of service to others; it takes students out of their comfort zone, challenging them to learn new skills and try on new perspectives; it offers the right balance of autonomy and mentoring to help students build self-confidence and a sense of purpose; it is accessible to students from all economic backgrounds.

The idea of integrating an experiential gap year with college may sound radical, but many colleges already routinely grant academic credit for service learning, internships, study abroad, and other forms of engaged learning. Education researchers have proven that these so-called high-impact practices improve student retention and engagement in college. However, many undergrads don’t have access to these formative experiences until their junior or senior year. Imagine how much we could amplify the positive effects if we offered students a megadose of high-impact practices at the beginning of college instead of at the end.

Reinforcing this point, the Gallup- Purdue Index, a large study of college graduates that seeks to track college outcomes, has demonstrated that how students go to college is much more important than where they go to college. Longitudinal data from the study show conclusively that the strongest predictors of future success are experiences that require initiative and agency — such as finding a mentor, having an internship, and doing a project that takes a semester or more to complete.

College leaders are desperate to cultivate a greater sense of civic responsibility among their students. In these turbulent political times, this is one of the most pressing challenges facing higher education. Similarly, educators recognize that the power skills of the 21st century — resilience, empathy, collaboration, initiative — are difficult to teach in the classroom. To build these skills, students need to be out in the world grappling with complex issues of identity, equity, diversity, and power. A purposeful gap year is a powerful way to build those muscles.And a growing number of colleges understand that a purposeful year off before college is the best way to ensure that more students arrive on campus prepared to declare both a major and a mission. Pioneering institutions are taking steps to repurpose gap years as transformative bridge years. Could this be the freshman-year makeover we’ve been hoping for?

Tufts and Princeton Universities have designed (and financed) their own service-oriented gap-year programs for incoming students, and several other institutions are exploring similar models. Meanwhile, the University of North Carolina, Florida State University, and Dickinson College all offer scholarships to make meaningful gap-year opportunities accessible to students from diverse backgrounds.

And there are numerous examples of admissions offices — including at Dartmouth College, Brown University, Rice University, Colorado College, and Middlebury College — that have developed useful gap-year resources for all prospective students. This is a perfect moment for other institutions to replicate and adapt these models to their own contexts.

In the next few weeks, admitted students may turn to you for guidance as they contemplate taking a gap year. Will you send them a form, or will you guide them toward a formative experience?

Abigail Falik is founder and chief executive of Global Citizen Year, a nonprofit dedicated to reinventing the gap year. Linda Frey is vice president for strategic partnerships at Global Citizen Year, where she leads the organization’s higher-education partnerships.

I‘ve had clients take a gap year for a variety of reasons.  Lets talk about what you can gain from spending a year, after high school or mid-college.  There are lots of options and many outcomes.  stephanie@accessguidance.com pr 610-212-6679

Curious About MIT?

Daan Mulder
Daan Mulder, studied at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Several things come to mind:

  • The professor you’ve just casually chatted with and asked about his/her research is actually a Nobel prize winner.
  • Everyone talks in code and it seems to make perfect sense: I’ll see you at E52; I’m taking 780 from course 15.
  • We complain that we should have gone to an easy college, like Harvard.
  • We constantly reference IHTFP (“I hate this f***ing place”) while secretly love every second here.
  • The institute is taken seriously by almost everyone. When we send emails from the MIT domain name (name@mit.edu) answer is almost always guaranteed.
  • You constantly feel inadequate by the level of the people around you (at orientation they even point out that it’s perfectly normal to have the “imposter syndrome”, i.e., feeling like you were admitted by mistake, as clearly you don’t feel like you deserve to be here with these people).
  • Sending an email to a wide distribution list saying “there is food left at [location]” and within seconds a swarm of hungry mouths descend, devour, and leave.
  • Playing with the beaver is totally not a sexual thing.

PS – sorry if this sounds like humblebrag. We’re really not full of ourselves here 🙂

 

ONE More comment from me: the most popular minor at MIT is music!

If MIT isn’t in your future, we can build a list of great colleges where you will thrive. stephanie@accessguidance.com pr 610-212-6679.

How Compensation Decisions Are Made

How Compensation Decisions Are Made

Understanding how employers make compensation decisions is critical if you want to be effective in negotiating your own compensation package.

Compensation has been very much in the news during the past year.  From the fervor over a $15.00 per hour minimum wage to robots coming to take people’s jobs to an accelerating employment market, compensation is on the minds and hearts of just about everyone. Before you can begin to get a handle on any of these issues, you first must have a basic understanding of how employers make compensation decisions.

Current Factors Impacting Compensation.

Like any other aspect of compensation, trends in the current market are impacting the compensation offered for specific positions.  Here are five of the factors that dramatically impact compensation ranges for virtually every position:

  1. The value of the work being done. Labor costs are almost always the single largest expense item incurred by any employer, other than the costs for the goods and services produced.  Labor costs include components such as base compensation (hourly or salary), variable compensation (such as bonuses or commissions), benefits, payroll taxes, and related insurances. So there is always pressure to assure that the value produced by each employee exceeds the costs associated with that employee.  Because the market sets to price for the goods and services it consumes, compensation must be tied to the value of what an employee’s work produces – or the employer cannot afford to remain in business.
  2. Supply vs. demand. This factor affects both industries and regions.  If there is a shortage of qualified candidates for a position in a particular area, compensation will tend to be on the high end of the range, with some employers electing to pay sign-on bonuses to attract candidates.  Likewise, if there is an over-supply of qualified candidates, compensation will be on the lower end of the range, with relatively few people hired in the higher ranges of compensation.  You will need to understand the dynamics of your industry and region.
  3. New job vs. raise. People changing employment (either inside their own company or moving to a different employer) tend to have larger compensation increases available, versus those staying in the same job or role.  The typical range for an annual increase is about 3%, while the average increase achieved when changing jobs is about 10%.
  4. Difficulty of filling the position. The difficulty an employer has experienced or (is anticipating) in filling the position will tend to increase what the employer is willing to pay.  Highly specialized skills, experience, and education are often the largest reason for the difficulty in filling a position.
  5. Benefits add 10% to 70% to total compensation. While benefits such as healthcare have been in the headlines during the past few years, the cumulative value of non-salary benefits is significant.  Here is an excellent calculator from CalcXML to determine the value of the benefits being offered.

The Mechanics of Compensation Decisions. 

Employers have established a range of what they are willing to pay for a particular position.  For example, a position with a target average annual salary of $55,000 might have the following range:

  1. Minimum – $45,000
  2. Mid-point – $55,000
  3. Maximum – $65,000

The interview process – the candidate’s credentials (résumé, social profile, and the like) and the results of any pre-offer background check (references, social media) – all influence where within the compensation range the initial offer will be made.

Researching compensation.

This can be done via the internet by Googling salary ranges or visiting compensation sites such as salary.com, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or payscale.com. Because information may be self-reported, tend to view these figures as optimistic about the position evaluated.  While the information provided on these sites is generally accurate (± 10%), there are regional differences, as well as differences from organization to organization.  Another helpful site for salary research is Glassdoor, which provides an inside look at jobs, companies, and compensation (as reported by current and former employees).  When calculating total compensation, bear in mind that benefits can be worth as little as 10% of base compensation, or as much as 50% or more.  Employer-paid expenses, travel allowances, hiring bonuses, tuition programs, insurances, paid time off, and other benefits add up quickly.

Some companies provide a lower starting salary, with a compensation increase once the new employee completes his/her training period (usually 90 days) and proves him/herself.  In a slow economy, there is an abundance of people looking for positions, so salaries can be somewhat depressed.  Likewise, when the economy is booming, starting salaries may be increased to attract better candidates.

Finally, understand that regional cost-of-living factors greatly affect the market-based compensation for any position.  A $60,000 position in an average cost of living area may translate to $48,000 in a low-cost area and $110,000 in a high-cost area.  Based on the relative cost of living of the area, the $48,000, $60,000, and $110,000 benchmarks reflect the same equivalent purchasing power.

Bottom Line

Like anything else in life, proper preparation prevents poor performance.  Never enter into a compensation negotiation without first having done your homework, with includes not only understanding how compensation for the position is established and what the reasonable ranges for compensation for your position by market, but also how you can prove that you’ll be able to deliver excellent value for the compensation you desire.

This article was excerpted from the most recent edition of Get a Better Job Faster? now available on Amazon.com.

Recommendations For Math Curriculum For High School

High Schoolers Should Take 4 Years of Leaner, More Relevant Math, Teachers’ Group Says

By Stephen Sawchuk on April 25, 2018 3:52 PM

High school math classes should be broadened to focus on goals beyond college and careers, including teaching the math students will need to be literate participants in civic life. Educators should ensure that all students master a core set of “essential concepts” through four years of math coursetaking. And the classes should be detracked, to prevent students of color from winding up in dead-end math pathways, says an expansive new report from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

The report, unveiled today at NCTM’s annual conference, is the product of a task force the group’s board of directors created back in 2016. Part vision-setting document and part stock-taking, the report aims to stimulate conversations on how to improve teaching of the subject in high school.

The Algebra-Geometry-Algebra 2 trifecta that has shaped high school math since the late 19th century remains firmly in place without enough evolution, it says. And while 4th grade students have progressed in math on the National Assessment of Educational Progress since the 1990s, scores have been stagnant for decades at grade 12.

The document is also a corrective of sorts to the high school math section of the Common Core State Standards. Some critics and even some of those standards’ developers have said the common core’s high school standards weren’t as lean and polished as those in the K-8 grades. The NCTM’s document attempts to identify areas of focus, as the common core’s K-8 standards do.

Purpose and Essential Concepts in Math

In a nutshell, the report says that the goal of math coursework shouldn’t be just to prepare students for college classes or work, but so they are better able to understand and critique the world. That includes being able to identify, interpret, and critique math in social, scientific, and political systems; to understand math in polls, the media, and other communications; and to make good financial decisions and interpret research.

As part of this effort, the publication gives a list of essential concepts in math that all  National Assessment of Educational Progress, students should master. Rather than a new set of standards, they should be thought of as “distillations” that will help bring focus to high school curricula, the report states. It breaks them down into the areas of essential concepts in number; algebra and functions; statistics and probability; and geometry and measurement.

For example, for statistics, it says, all high school students should be able to understand the differences in research methods that use sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies, and the problems of bias and validity, among other things.

As part of this, it recommends that some practices should be scaled back. Too much focus in algebra is put on solving equations and inequalities, rather than on learning how to use math techniques to produce a certain outcome, solve a problem, or provide proofs of why algebraic statements are true, the report says.

“There is a lot of what we might refer to as legacy content, particularly in second-year algebra where students spend a great deal of time on symbolic manipulations—factoring equations, solving equations,” said Matt Larson, the outgoing president of the NCTM. “Today the emphasis has to move to students understanding, here’s a problem situation that can be modeled by using a quandratic equation and then solved. And when you think you have the solution, understanding the math enough to say, ‘Yeah, my solution seems reasonable,’ or ‘No, that doesn’t seem to make Math concepts, sense in this particular situation.'”

Equity and Access in Mathematics

Of course, those key shifts will also require new thinking about who takes the classes. On this front, the NCTM says mathematics classes should no longer track teachers or students into different levels (like “remedial” versus “honors” versions of the same course).

“Tracking … in some cases puts students into terminal mathematics course pathways that are not mathematically meaningful and do not prepare them for any continued study of fundamental mathematics concepts,” the report says.

As if on cue, the U.S. Department of Education released data yesterday showing that a disproportionate number of students of color don’t take Algebra 1 until the 11th grade, all but ruling out the possibility of higher-level math attainment.

While acknowledging that detracking poses challenges, it can be supported by having schools begin to examine data patterns and assignments, Larson said. That includes which teachers are typically assigned to teach which course levels.

“Often it’s the case that those teachers who are the most experienced or perceived to be the most capable are assigned the upper-level math classes. An initial action we recommend is, again, to examine the data,” Larson said. “Who is teaching whom in your high school math department?”

And teachers should focus on equitable instruction that focuses on reasoning, problem solving, using mathematical representations, and facilitating mathematical discourse, in which where students and teachers feel comfortable discussing and critiquing one another’s reasoning, rather than focusing on “getting the right answer.”

Finally, the report calls on rethinking math pathways: All students should take four years of classes that “maintain the integrity” of the mathematical standards, require clarity and precision, and don’t allow for substitutions, such as computer science, to stand in for math.

I’ll be interested in hearing how the larger math community responds to this report. Any talk about the balance of procedural and conceptual math is bound to raise passionate discussion. Our comments section is open for your feedback!

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2018/04/high_school_math_vision_nctm.html?cmp=eml-eb-popweek+05042018&M=58473827&U=1678853

 

You Really Must Negotiate Job-Offer Salary!

The Muse offers these suggestions for negotiating the salary when you are offered a new position.   https://www.themuse.com/advice/can-i-negotiate-job-offer-when-the-description-lists-salary  Read the article below:

Negotiations are often nerve-racking for candidates because they don’t want to ask for too much and have an employer withdraw an offer.

But I want to give you reassurance that as much as you fear losing out on an opportunity, companies also fear losing great talent (like you!) by coming in below expectations. That’s why companies and candidates often have an open discussion to meet somewhere in the middle.

With that said, what can you do if the job description clearly states a salary—yet you want more? Are you still even entitled to that attempt to find some middle ground?

If you’re applying to the public sector (government jobs), the pre-determined salary range is usually close to the final offer. However, if you receive an offer, it doesn’t hurt to ask for a number that falls within the range displayed. As with any negotiation, focus on objective facts of why you believe you’re worth more (for example, the job description asks for two years of experience and you have four).

If you’re applying to the private sector (non-government jobs), I would absolutely recommend negotiating despite what was displayed on the job posting. Most companies work with a compensation benchmark system and have a low, mid, and high end of a salary range. Typically, the salary advertised is the median compensation, so it never hurts to ask for more—especially if market research data shows that your title, skills, and experience are worth a higher salary in your geographical market.

Again, you will want to remain objective in your approach: What specifically about your background adds value to the company and justifies why are you worth more? You should use measurable and tangible facts instead of subjective, loose opinions.

It might also help to know that employers expect employees to negotiate. Employers typically don’t withdraw offers because a candidate starts that conversation. However, they do withdraw offers based on how a candidate asks.

If you demonstrate that you’re polite, professional, and perceptive, an employer’s often eager to consider your requests. It’s the requests that come off as aggressive, demanding, and non-compromising that breaks the deal.

That’s why it’s never a bad idea to practice several times before the real conversation to make sure you know exactly what you want to say. You can even run through it with a friend to confirm that you’re coming off the way you intended.

Finally, if the company says they have given you the best offer, remember there are a lot of other benefits and perks you can negotiate aside from your salary.

For example:

  • Sign-on bonus
  • More vacation days
  • Telecommute perks
  • Tuition reimbursement or ongoing education and training allowance
  • Timing of next raise
  • Stock options
  • Competitive commission structure (if in a sales-related role)
  • Relocation bonus (if applicable)

Negotiating might always make you a little nervous (that’s normal!). But, in the end, remember this: You won’t get what you don’t ask for.

Let me add my own comments.  Women are earn less than men doing the same work.  One reason is that men are far more likely to negotiate starting with the first offer while women tend to accept the first offer.  To close the gap, women must adopt negotiation as the first step in getting paid what they are worth.  As the article points out, HR expects negotiation.

If the starting salary is lower for women, each raise that is a % of current salary will also be lower.  The gap gets wider with each salary bump.  Close the gap by asking for what you want.

In addition to the perks listed as alternatives to a starting salary, you can ask for a 90 day review with specific benchmarks that, if met, entitle you to a raise.  You can also ask for a performance bonus, an extra check for meeting specific performance criteria.

If you’re a little hazy on what you’re work is worth, lets figure it out together. stephanie@accessguidance.com , 610-212-6679

Juniata Summer Health Professions Institute

Juniata College Summer Health Professions Institute  2018

The Health Professions Institute provides opportunities for high school students to explore different areas of health care as a career discipline. Students will engage in lectures and labs with the College’s faculty. Additionally, participants will have many opportunities to converse with health care professionals including physicians, nurses, health care administrators, and research scientists.Topics could include: 

Alzheimer’s Research
Genetics/Data Analysis
Cognitive Neuroscience
Food as Science
Envir. Factors & Health Implications

 

 

Who should attend? 
Rising high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have expressed interest in working in health care and want to know more about health careers.

 

This experience will focus on career exploration, college immersion, and a variety of learning activities. By conducting lab work, traveling to local health care facilities, and working in small groups, students will prepare a presentation for the final day of the Institute.

For questions contact:
Colton Bright
Email:brightc@juniata.edu Office:814-641-3603