Tagged: Career Enlightenment

Hashtags Job Hunters Need To Know

15 Great Twitter Hashtags to Secure Your Dream Job

by Kate Jones | Aug 17, 2017 | Social Media Job Seeking |Career Enlightenment

Hashtags to find an employer:

  1. #hiring: Unsurprisingly, the number one hashtag hiring managers use.
  2. #joblisting: This one is pretty much guaranteed to take you straight to a role specification.
  3. #tweetmyjobs: This has been tagged nearly a million times so it’s worth including in your search.
  4. #ukjobs: If you’re looking for something UK based this will take you straight to the goods. You can also change it up with #*yourcity*jobs to get super specific.
  5. #graduate: If you’re fresh out of university, use this hashtag to find graduate positions.

Hashtags to let employers know you’re looking:

  1. #hireme: Get straight to the point – you’re on the lookout!
  2. #resume: Twice as popular as #CV, this is the one to use if you’re sharing your resume online.
  3. #MBA: If you have an MBA, let potential employers know about your impressive educational background.
  4. #HR: This hashtag makes your post visible to anyone searching in the HR thread.
  5. #careerchange: Great if you’re looking to take your career in a new direction.

Industry specific hashtags:

  1. #salesjobs: This popular hashtag will take you straight to sales jobs listings.
  2. #accounting: If you’re an accountant you’re in luck – listings in this field come up regularly on Twitter.
  3. #SEO: A popular area for recruitment, this one has been tagged more than a million times by job seekers.
  4. #journojobs: For budding journalists, look no further than this hashtag to find your dream position.
  5. #industry: Use this with another tag like #tech or #marketing and you’ll find listings matched to your area of expertise.

If you have a crystal-clear idea of what you’re after, hashtag the specific job you are looking for. This is perfect for those of us in specialist industries such as web development, HR or professional services.

Another option if you’re looking for something a little more niche is this clever tool from Hashtagify which allows you to search for popular hashtags.

Finally, a great way to grab the attention of a potential employer is by using a picture with your tweet – Twitter posts with images receive 150% more engagement.

Conventional methods for finding a job are slowly fading into the background, and the hashtag is now your best friend for securing the position of your dreams. Twitter should be right up there at the top of your list of ways to find your next role.

 

Where Resumes and Job Ads Don’t Match

One of the most basic parameters for creating a resume that attracts attention and passes the Applicant Tracking System is  a match between the requirements listed in the job posting and those on a resume.

LiveCareer analyzed several thousand resumes and job openings in 12 career areas, about one quarter of all job categories, to find where applicants claims don’t match the needs of the employers.  They found several gaps that are easily plugged.

Increasingly, soft skills are important to companies hiring.  Soft skills are communication, customer service and so on. Other gaps between desired  qualities and offered skills found by hiring managers are in multitasking, knowledge of retail industry, teamwork, and a positive attitude.

These asks make up one quarter to one half of those listed as necessary but don’t make it onto most resumes.  Job posting typically ask for over 20 items,  resumes claim, on average, 13.  It is easy to put relevant experience with examples into a resume matching the words used by the hiring party.

If you want to get your resume to the person who will decide to interview you, take time to match the requirements to your skills, 1:1.  Have qualifiers ready to prove your ability to meet expectations.  Don’t bother to include things like budgeting, time management or use of Microsoft Word, or anything else not asked for.  The ATS looks for the words the hiring manager tells it to look for and will skip over anything else.

Bring me your job posting and your experience and we’ll craft a resume that passes the ATS and makes it to the hiring manager.  stephanie@accessguidance.com or 610-212-6679/

 

 

How Compensation Decisions Are Made

How Compensation Decisions Are Made

Understanding how employers make compensation decisions is critical if you want to be effective in negotiating your own compensation package.

Compensation has been very much in the news during the past year.  From the fervor over a $15.00 per hour minimum wage to robots coming to take people’s jobs to an accelerating employment market, compensation is on the minds and hearts of just about everyone. Before you can begin to get a handle on any of these issues, you first must have a basic understanding of how employers make compensation decisions.

Current Factors Impacting Compensation.

Like any other aspect of compensation, trends in the current market are impacting the compensation offered for specific positions.  Here are five of the factors that dramatically impact compensation ranges for virtually every position:

  1. The value of the work being done. Labor costs are almost always the single largest expense item incurred by any employer, other than the costs for the goods and services produced.  Labor costs include components such as base compensation (hourly or salary), variable compensation (such as bonuses or commissions), benefits, payroll taxes, and related insurances. So there is always pressure to assure that the value produced by each employee exceeds the costs associated with that employee.  Because the market sets to price for the goods and services it consumes, compensation must be tied to the value of what an employee’s work produces – or the employer cannot afford to remain in business.
  2. Supply vs. demand. This factor affects both industries and regions.  If there is a shortage of qualified candidates for a position in a particular area, compensation will tend to be on the high end of the range, with some employers electing to pay sign-on bonuses to attract candidates.  Likewise, if there is an over-supply of qualified candidates, compensation will be on the lower end of the range, with relatively few people hired in the higher ranges of compensation.  You will need to understand the dynamics of your industry and region.
  3. New job vs. raise. People changing employment (either inside their own company or moving to a different employer) tend to have larger compensation increases available, versus those staying in the same job or role.  The typical range for an annual increase is about 3%, while the average increase achieved when changing jobs is about 10%.
  4. Difficulty of filling the position. The difficulty an employer has experienced or (is anticipating) in filling the position will tend to increase what the employer is willing to pay.  Highly specialized skills, experience, and education are often the largest reason for the difficulty in filling a position.
  5. Benefits add 10% to 70% to total compensation. While benefits such as healthcare have been in the headlines during the past few years, the cumulative value of non-salary benefits is significant.  Here is an excellent calculator from CalcXML to determine the value of the benefits being offered.

The Mechanics of Compensation Decisions. 

Employers have established a range of what they are willing to pay for a particular position.  For example, a position with a target average annual salary of $55,000 might have the following range:

  1. Minimum – $45,000
  2. Mid-point – $55,000
  3. Maximum – $65,000

The interview process – the candidate’s credentials (résumé, social profile, and the like) and the results of any pre-offer background check (references, social media) – all influence where within the compensation range the initial offer will be made.

Researching compensation.

This can be done via the internet by Googling salary ranges or visiting compensation sites such as salary.com, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or payscale.com. Because information may be self-reported, tend to view these figures as optimistic about the position evaluated.  While the information provided on these sites is generally accurate (± 10%), there are regional differences, as well as differences from organization to organization.  Another helpful site for salary research is Glassdoor, which provides an inside look at jobs, companies, and compensation (as reported by current and former employees).  When calculating total compensation, bear in mind that benefits can be worth as little as 10% of base compensation, or as much as 50% or more.  Employer-paid expenses, travel allowances, hiring bonuses, tuition programs, insurances, paid time off, and other benefits add up quickly.

Some companies provide a lower starting salary, with a compensation increase once the new employee completes his/her training period (usually 90 days) and proves him/herself.  In a slow economy, there is an abundance of people looking for positions, so salaries can be somewhat depressed.  Likewise, when the economy is booming, starting salaries may be increased to attract better candidates.

Finally, understand that regional cost-of-living factors greatly affect the market-based compensation for any position.  A $60,000 position in an average cost of living area may translate to $48,000 in a low-cost area and $110,000 in a high-cost area.  Based on the relative cost of living of the area, the $48,000, $60,000, and $110,000 benchmarks reflect the same equivalent purchasing power.

Bottom Line

Like anything else in life, proper preparation prevents poor performance.  Never enter into a compensation negotiation without first having done your homework, with includes not only understanding how compensation for the position is established and what the reasonable ranges for compensation for your position by market, but also how you can prove that you’ll be able to deliver excellent value for the compensation you desire.

This article was excerpted from the most recent edition of Get a Better Job Faster? now available on Amazon.com.