Tagged: study abroad

U of New South Wales for Study Abroad or a Degree

Sydney, Australia is home to the University of New South Wales, a research institution that hosts about 1000 American study abroad students each year and many more who earn a degree from UNSW.

Ten minutes from a gorgeous beach and 15 minutes from the thriving business and cultural center, UNSW attracts students from all over Australia and the world.  Ranked at #45 on the list of top world universities, most departments are in the top 50 world wide.

American students can choose this university for their degree studies and spend their study abroad time at a university in the US (or anywhere else!).  Tuition plus room and board run about $45,000 US dollars.  Law and medicine are direct entry meaning that you can earn your degree in the 4 years that your  friends are doing undergraduate work.  Both degrees are recognized in the US.

There are 15 flights daily from Philadelphia to Sydney.  That amounts to lots of people going from here.  All of the Fortune 500 companies have offices in Sydney, just in case you’re looking for an internship.

Undergraduate degrees take 3 years with an optional 4th year which most students choose.

Australia has its own college admission test; scores determine which universities the student can apply to.  Students from the US submit ACT, SAT, or IB scores and a transcript without taking the Australian admissions test.  In order to welcome more American students, admission requirements for US students are not as stringent as they are for top US colleges, although they vary by area of study.  Engineering requires a 26/27 on the ACT; 1240-1290 SAT; IB 32-34, depending on the engineering program.  Bachelors of Medicine is 29 ACT; 1390 SAT; 38 IB.  Architectural Studies ask for 28 ACT; 1280 SAT; 33 IB.

Here’s a glossary of terms you’ll need to know to convert Aussie Speak into standard US college lingo.

Australian                    US

Faculty                           College (College of Arts and Sciences)

Program                       Major

College                         Residence Hall

Example: “I’m applying to the Faculty of Built Environment to study city planning or computational design although I’m still interested in interior architecture.  I’ll be living in Fig Tree Hall, an alcohol free college.”

Translation: “I’m applying to the college of Built Environments where I’ll study urban planning or computational design; I’m still interested in interior design.  My dorm is Fig Tree Hall which is a substance-free living space.”

Should you be interested in more information for admission or study abroad, I’ll give you the local reps name and contact information.  stephanie@accessguidance.com or 610-212-6679

Study Abroad: Make the Most of Your Experience

Greek Orthodox Church
Greek Orthodox Church

You can learn a lot about the world by living for a time in another country.  Employers like to see cultural experience on a resume, especially if they do business with executives who were raised and educated abroad or have contracts with companies in other countries.

Academics: Plan ahead so that you will be able to take courses that meet your graduation requirements.  That might mean saving your electives and completing most of the courses in your major before you leave.  A little investigation may yield study abroad programs that will enhance your major field of study better than others.

Cultural Exposure: Don’t spend your time with your room- or housemates.  Explore the town or city.  Get to know some of the locals by greeting and beginning conversations however limited your grasp of the language.  Unless advised otherwise, take public transportation or walk.  Make adults your target because they will have a broader perspective and a wider range or experience.

Just spending time outside the US isn’t enough to qualify for cultural literacy.  It’s necessary to actually experience the other culture as though it was going to become your own.

Here are some ways to make use of time spent living and learning to “Walk like an Egyptian“.

  1. Visit museums and locally important places

    Punakha, Bhutan
    Punakha, Bhutan
  2. Attend festivals, services at the place of worship you favor, public events
  3. If its the custom in the country where you will be studying, learn to haggle and bargain
  4. Speak the language as often as possible.  It makes you look smart and friendly.
  5. Become familiar with customs and laws

Playing it Safe: The laws and customs vary from country to country.  Be respectful of the dress codes for work, school, and casual occasions so that you don’t embarrass yourself or you hosts.  In many places the short shorts and midriff baring tops worn at home are considered inappropriate.

Likewise, the law and customs regarding alcohol, pot and other drugs are different.  As a non-resident you may be judged harshly if you break a law that would earn you a warning if done at home.  Assume that you will not be able to get away with violations that a “townie” (local resident) teenager can slip under the radar.  In most countries you do not have the same rights-an attorney, presumption of innocence, lenience toward young adults- that Americans at home have.  The embassy may not be able to assist you if you get into legal trouble.

In Europe, teenagers may be permitted to drink beer and wine in public establishments.  Being 7 or 8 hours from home will not increase your tolerance for alcohol.  or reduce the likelihood of doing something you wouldn’t do sober.

Bottom Line:  Bring your most mature behavior with you.  Have a good time, meet lots of great people, prepare to use what you experience to help you in the job market.

elephant-241624_640If you are looking for a Gap Year experience outside the US or want to lean how to turn you Study Abroad into a job attracting tool, text or call Stephanie 610-212-6679; the email is stephaine@accessguidance.com.